Book Signing & Discussion on Afrofuturism

Book Signing & Discussion on Afrofuturism With Author Ytasha Womack

Whether or not you’re a fantasy or sci-fi enthusiast, you’ll want to be a part of this extraordinary discussion and book signing today! Author Ytasha Womack brings passion for what she does into the discussion, and a wealth of knowledge on Afrofuturism. Don’t know much about the subject matter? Womack declares, “Afrofuturism is something already connected to what you’re doing though you’re not really familiar with the term.” So come out and learn more!

Wildseeds: The Octavia Butler Emergent Strategy Collective is very excited to participate in this amazing evening of conversation with author Ytasha Womack.Soraya Jean-Louis McElroy, co-founder of Wildseeds, will be a part of the program, and fellow Wildseeds member Kris Ford, librarian from the African American Resource Center at the New Orleans Public Library, will bring along a book display featuring works on Afrofuturism and works from Black and Brown sci-fi and speculative fiction authors.

Saturday, January 24, 2015 | 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Ashé Cultural Arts Center | 1712 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., NOLA
The event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

___

Ytasha Womack is an author, filmmaker, dancer, and innovator. Her book Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci Fi and Fantasy explores black sci-fi culture, bleeks, black comix, and the legacy of futurism. In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, and N. K. Jemisin to the musical cosmos of Sun Ra, George Clinton, and the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, to the visual and multimedia artists inspired by African Dogon myths and Egyptian deities, the book’s topics range from the “alien” experience of blacks in America to the “wake up” cry that peppers sci-fi literature, sermons, and activism. With a twofold aim to entertain and enlighten, she explains that Afrofuturists strive to break down racial, ethnic, and social limitations to empower and free individuals to be themselves.

The New Orleans-based Wildseeds is a collective of women of color that uses speculative fiction as a resource for social change. Their work is steeped in Black feminist traditions of survival and healing and engages Octavia Butler and other speculative/sci-fi and fantastical authors.

Advertisements